XP ne d

Le
P4nd1-P4nd4
Windows XP Slow to Take Hold – Paula Rooney, CRN, Oct 11, 2002

On the first anniversary of Windows XP's release, Microsoft has little
to celebrate.

Less than 10 percent of Microsoft's installed base has upgraded to
Windows XP since its release last October. That matches a 2001 Gartner
prediction that nearly 75 percent of all corporate PCs would still be
running Windows 95, 98 or NT Workstation by the end of 2002.

The adoption rate for the installed base of 250 million Windows users
is "pretty small," said Rogers Weed, vice president of Windows client
product management at Microsoft. "We're trying to kick-start some
momentum."


-

Users cling to old Microsoft operating systems – Ina Fried, CNET, Dec
12, 2003

[A] new study shows that a substantial number of businesses, both large
and small, are still using [Windows 98].

The study looked at 372,129 PCs from 670 companies ranging in size from
10 to 49,000 employees. …

In total, Windows 95 made up 14.7 percent of operating systems, and
Windows 98 made up 12.5 percent. Windows 2000 was the most common OS,
running on slightly more than half of machines, while its predecessor,
Windows NT4, was still used on 13.3 percent of desktops.

Windows XP, the most current version of Windows, was found on just 6.6
percent of the machines

-

One month later, in January 2004, ZDNet Australia reported that
Microsoft was extending support for Windows 98, Windows 98 SE, and
Windows ME:


The software giant has prolonged support for the operating systems
until June 30, 2006. During that time, paid over-the-phone support will
be available, "critical" security issues will be reviewed, and
"appropriate steps" taken.

The company's support for the Windows 98 family of operating systems
was scheduled to end this Friday, with support for Windows ME due to
expire in December of this year.

"Microsoft made this decision to assist our customers worldwide who are
still dependent upon these operating systems and to provide Microsoft
more time to communicate its product lifecycle support guidelines in a
handful of markets?-particularly smaller and emerging markets," said
Danny Beck, Microsoft Australia's senior Windows desktop product
marketing manager.

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Le 22/10/12 12:04, P4nd1-P4nd4 a écrit :
Windows XP Slow to Take Hold – Paula Rooney, CRN, Oct 11, 2002

On the first anniversary of Windows XP's release, Microsoft has little
to celebrate.

Less than 10 percent of Microsoft's installed base has upgraded to
Windows XP since its release last October. That matches a 2001 Gartner
prediction that nearly 75 percent of all corporate PCs would still be
running Windows 95, 98 or NT Workstation by the end of 2002.

The adoption rate for the installed base of 250 million Windows users is
"pretty small," said Rogers Weed, vice president of Windows client
product management at Microsoft. "We're trying to kick-start some
momentum."






A mon avis MS ne va pas se remettre de cet échec, et 2003 sera l'année
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